Archive for November 2015
On Sunday at 4:01:58 GMT, the trimaran Spindrift 2 crossed the start line that runs from Créac’h lighthouse (Ushant Island, France) to Lizard Point (Cornwall) for the start of her crewed nonstop circumnavigation.
Jeff Lee’s San Juan 33 Zwei Flying Fish checks out the breeze off Alameda Marina before an Island Nights Friday night beer can race, hosted by Island YC, whose clubhouse is on the Alameda Marina property.
The crew works on perfecting roll jibes during last Saturday’s light conditions.  © 2015 Martha Blanchfield San Francisco’s J/125 Double Trouble crew wrapped up a final practice last weekend before they travel east to Quantum Key West Race Week and the Conch Republic Regatta to Cuba.
"We saw 87° water in a number of places on the way from La Paz to here on Banderas Bay," Arjan Bok, the San Francisco owner of the Schionning 43 cat Rot Kat told Latitude about a week ago.
The recent voyages of Russian-born sailor Rimas Meleshyus, 63, have garnered widespread interest within the sailing community, not because he has proven to be a great mariner, but because despite having virtually no training or previous offshore experience, he has survived thousands of miles of open-ocean sailing aboard a tiny trailer-sailer.
Steve Carroll’s Tule Fog was one of 16 Express 27s racing in the BYC Midwinters on Saturday, a civilized day for sailing on the Berkeley Circle.
Jonathan and Rebecca Mote and their six-month-old Morkie, Pirate, of the Corona del Mar-based Jeanneau 42DS Serendipity relax in Turtle Bay during the Baja Ha-Ha.
Two weeks after departing from Bahia Caraquez, Equador, on a solo, nonstop lap around the planet aboard the Baba 40 Sailor’s Run, West Coast sailor Jeff Hartjoy, 69, reports that the sailing thus far has been "some of the very best I have ever done." But his euphoria was dampened yesterday, when he made a life-threatening discovery.
For cruising sailors the annual Sailors’ Spash and Banderas Bay Blast are great fun without the pressure of serious racing.
Merlin finishing the 1977 Transpac, captured by an unknown photographer. © Wizard Yachts, Ltd.
The first week of the 12th Transat Jacques Vabre was full of doom and gloom; two autumn gales led the way to a flipped maxi-tri, several broken boats, a half-sunk Hugo Boss, and several sailors enduring dramatic helicopter rescues at sea.
Profligate, fleeing the temperate zone for the tropics, despite the danger of sailing off the curve of the earth.  latitude/Richard
©2015Latitude 38 Media, LLC It was only in August that we brought the 63-ft catamaran Profligate 1,000 miles north from Puerto Vallarta to San Diego, with a six-day weather layover in Cabo and Gomorrah.
This boat is surrounded by either a flood or a drought. Since it’s in California… latitude/JR
©2015Latitude 38 Media, LLC In addition to the much more dire consequences of the California drought, lake sailing has suffered.
Peter Boland and Erik Pavelka’s J/80 Acqua Veloce raced in SYC’s chilly, foggy, drizzly first Midwinter race on the first day of November.
Doing their best impression of Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr in the 1953 classic From Here to Eternity, this unidentified couple gets an A for effort.  latitude/Andy
©Latitude 38 Media, LLC All that’s left of the 22nd annual Baja Ha-Ha cruisers’ rally from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas, with stops at Turtle Bay and Bahia Santa Maria, are the memories.
We were on the Baja Ha-Ha when we read in ‘Lectronic that Bill Lee had bought Merlin, the ultralight sled that he’d designed and built in 1977, and that he had trucked back to Santa Cruz with an eye to doing the 2017 Transpac.
These days, historical milestones seem to pop up every few weeks on the evening news.
Bathed in early morning light and driven by a light breeze from the northeast, the Ventura-based Beneteau 40 Vanishing Girl — a former Sunsail charter yacht — and the Ensenada-based Catalina 445 Tranquillo slipped out of the Bahia Santa Maria anchorage Thursday morning, destination: Cabo San Lucas.
Flop-stoppers, roll stabilizers, anti-roll devices — whatever you call them, they’re required equipment if you want a good night’s sleep in a rolly anchorage.
The scene yesterday on Profligate, Baja Ha-Ha’s mothership, anchored in Bahia Santa Maria.
Old Pulteney and US Sailing have teamed up to honor men and women in sailing communities around the country for their outstanding humanitarian achievements.
The Baja Ha-Ha fleet is safe and sound in Bahia Santa Maria after great sailing for much of the 260-mile second leg of the rally from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas.
"One more milestone!" wrote Donna Lange in her sailing blog last week. "I am now past the Cape (of Good Hope) and Agulhas Point, the southernmost tip of Africa." This is the first of the five great capes the 53-year-old grandmother, former RN, and Rhode Island-based singer-songwriter must leave to port on her quest to become the first American woman to sail singlehanded around the world via the traditional ‘clipper route.’ As we reported in ‘Lectronic on July 8, Lange departed Bristol, RI, on July 26 on her Southern Cross 28 Inspired Insanity on her second — you read right — solo circumnavigation.
A cornucopia of sailing stories awaits you inside the cover of Latitude 38’s November issue.
Who wants to race on Halloween? Tiburon YC, that’s who. Usually TYC’s Red Rock Regatta conflicts with RYC’s Great Pumpkin, but not this year.
Tom Wurfl and Helen Downs’ Lagoon 42 Catatude and scores of other sailboats paraded out of San Diego Bay on their way to the start of the 22nd Baja Ha-Ha on Monday morning.
The legendary ocean racer Merlin is coming home to Santa Cruz. Her designer, builder and original owner, Bill Lee, has bought her back.