Archive for November 2017
It may only be autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, but all along the West Coast of the Americas dozens of sailors are thinking ahead to early spring.
With credit to REI for creating  a ‘new Black Friday tradition’ by closing the doors on all their stores on Black Friday to encourage everyone to #optoutdoors, we are getting onboard with #optsailing for Black Friday.
What happens in Vegas might stay in Vegas. But not at Latitude. Longtime readers will know we’ve been pretty forthcoming about mistakes, screw-ups and bloopers (which can be one and the same, but not always).
Sailing is one of the great escapes, and it’s nice to have a boat that’s ready to go when the mood strikes and the weather is right.
Ramp launching a Catalina 22 in Santa Cruz’s East Harbor. © Vikas Kapur Seeking a change of pace from daysailing on San Francisco Bay, reader Vikas Kapur headed to Santa Cruz last weekend for a sail on Monterey Bay in a Catalina 22.
The Atlantic Rally for Cruisers, the granddaddy of all cruising rallies, got underway on Wednesday with the first of two fleets.
François Gabart’s team posted this graphic on social media. The team’s Twitter feed included a handful of congratulatory posts yesterday before the number finally settled out at an astounding 851 miles sailed in 24 hours.
We first started watching the Volvo Ocean Race in 1997/98. It was the last year it was called the Whitbread, and Bay Area sailor Paul Cayard — along with John Kostecki, Mark Rudiger and Kimo Worthington — would go on to win the ‘regatta’ on board the Swedish-flagged EF Language.  The last Whitbread was especially exciting because it was ‘online’, which was something of a revolutionary concept at the time.
Despite the fact that two out of three of the legs in the 750-mile Baja Ha-Ha cruisers rally from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas featured lighter wind than any of the 478 people on the 133 boats would have liked, the event was still a capital-B Blast (and the sailing in the 240-mile second leg was fabulous).
Seth Clark, owner of the Express 27 Current Affair, wrote the following on the Cal Sailing Club listserve: "There is a large deadhead (submerged log) just west X buoy.
Bay Area sailor and world-renowned navigator Stan Honey has been elected by the board of directors of the Sailing Yacht Research Foundation (SYRF) as their new chairman. The group was formed in 2006 with the goal "to develop and catalog the science underlying sailboat performance resulting in more accurate sailboat handicapping formulae for the benefit of all racing sailors." Stan Honey has a long list of sailing accomplishments.
Here’s your 2017 Baja Ha-Ha recap: the fleet did a roughly three-day leg from San Diego to Turtle Bay (about halfway down the Baja peninsula), then Turtle Bay to Bahia Santa Maria, then on to Cabo San Lucas for the finish, which was officially last night at El Squid Roe, where the Poobah could be seen in all his fluorescent orange T-shirt glory.
Before the first Bay Bridge, the way to get your car to San Francisco from the East Bay was via car ferry from the end of the Berkeley Pier.
The recent New York City marathon may have a lesson for sailboat racing and those seeking the ever-elusive ‘fair’ rating rule.
We’d like to introduce a few films that wouldn’t necessarily be considered ‘sailing movies’, but have references to, or underlying hints of sailing and/ or seamanship. Back in August, when we first solicited readers for their favorite sailing films, Lee Johnson wrote:   "My favorite sailing movie is Cast Away, a Robert Zemeckis film starring Tom Hanks, which doesn’t have much actual sailing in it, other than the one scene where Hanks’ character, Chuck Noland, tops the breakers to escape the island with his raft using a broken outhouse [portable toilet] shell for a sail.
Who was the greatest American singlehanded round-the-world sailor? Do Americans even compete in races like the Vendée Globe or the Velux 5 Oceans Race (formerly known as the BOC Challenge)? While participation in those events seems more or less limited to the French, the Kiwis and the English — and before Bay Area local Bruce Schwab hit the scene in the mid 2000s — there was an American sailing around the planet with the best of them.
The world of offshore yacht racing just got a shot in the arm over the weekend with four major events getting underway, all in Europe.
Gray, light air remained for the first couple of days of the 24th Baja Ha-Ha, as the Navy seemed to escort the fleet out of San Diego Bay.  latitude/Tim
©2017Latitude 38 Media, LLC Everyone likes a nice breeze for a sail, but when you’re cruising, it’s just not as critical.
I love the Baja Ha-Ha. Love, love, love it! Sure, there wasn’t much wind in the 360-mile first leg, although lots of boats got in a day or so of light-air sailing.
Unfortunately for the crew of CV24 Greenings, that entry is out for the remainder of the Clipper 2017-18 Race.
The following is Part 2 of a dispatch of John Tysell’s sail from San Diego to San Francisco in 1979 (Click here for Part I):   The biggest challenge of my trip from San Diego to San Francisco with my girlfriend Gwynne Crouse was rounding Point Conception, known for strong wind and nasty seas.
Reader Craig Dahl spotted this 30-ft ketch on the rocks in Drake’s Bay between Chimney Rock and the Lifeboat Station over the weekend.
After being delayed from his original early-October departure date, Randall Reeves has sailed through the Golden Gate and begun the first-ever "Figure 8 Voyage," a solo circumnavigation which will take him from San Francisco, around Antarctica, then up across the Northwest Passage and back to the Bay.
If you need a break from putting away all the Halloween decorations and cleaning up the smashed pumpkins, we’ve got just the thing.
The bizarre story of the Sea Nymph — a Morgan 45 that had left Hawaii in May and was reportedly adrift for five months — is getting weirder by the day.
In Monday’s ‘Lectronic Latitude, we posted the trivia quiz questions posed to the racers in Sunday’s Great Pumpkin Regatta, hosted by Richmond Yacht Club.
The 750-mile Baja Ha-Ha cruising rally kicked off on Sunday, October 29, under sunny skies in the parking lot of the San Diego West Marine store located near the heart of Shelter Island.
The following is a dispatch from John Tysell.  It was June of 1979, and I had just completed my first long-distance race on my Cal 3-30 Soufriere, a 30-ft sloop I purchased in November 1975 to race on the Bay, and then, in the ocean.
November has California in its sights like a low-pressure system barreling down from the Aleutian Islands.