Archive for September 2017
There are many reasons to sail. Peace and love are good ones. latitude/John
©Latitude 38 Media, LLC Hey man, is this groovy or what?
Icom makes fine radios. On Profligate, we have an Icom VHF radio. Nice piece of equipment.
Thanks to everyone who commented on Latitude 38’s Sailing Movie Club’s second film: Wind, a movie we’re not afraid to call a classic, even though it was not well received at the box office in 1992, and even though the film, like all art imitating life, took some liberties with the truth (a masthead spinnaker on a 12-Meter!).
There are plenty of boats headed south for cruising season, while others are out just enjoying idyllic, sunny fall breezes. Lone Star was lookin’ good while out for a Saturday evening sail off Angel Island when she lined up midspan in the autumn light.
The forecast for this week’s Etchells World Championship being hosted by the San Francisco Yacht Club on the Berkeley Circle is hot.
While he’s always a gentleman, Fin can nonetheless swing an encouraging sledge hammer when required.
If you’re taking a boat to Mexico, or buying a boat you think you might someday take to Mexico, you must be sure that everything is in order with regard to the Temporary Import Permit (TIP).
If you’re going to have a kick-off party, why not have it on the beach at the Santa Barbara YC, the premier yacht club beach site on the West Coast?
Can you feel it in the air? That undeniable crispness, the bite that comes from a cool, still day, rather than the searing, blasting cold of the summer seabreeze.
Puerto Rico has sustained a ‘direct hit’ by Hurricane Maria, now a Category 4 storm with winds up to 140 mph — and perhaps worse, unrelenting rain inundating the island, which had already sustained damage from Hurricane Irma.
Yumi Wilson was reading through a copy of Latitude 38 when she came across a flyer saying ‘Your Lucky Day’.
There’s no point in mourning the "good old days" of the St. Francis Yacht Club Big Boat Series — you know, when the boats were really big, with lots of 70-footers and such.
Acknowledging the adage that ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’, we’ll let the accompanying photo by Glenn Twitchell give the definitive answer to what’s so good about the Sea of Cortez.
Hurricane season is not ‘officially’ over until November 30, something we’re reminded of following the devastation of Harvey, Irma and tropical storms/hurricanes Jose, Katia, Lee and Maria.
California’s largest annual volunteer event, California Coastal Cleanup, takes place on the third Saturday of each September, along more than 2,000 miles of coastal and inland waterfront.
Monohulls. Foiling monohulls. At least that’s the news we heard from Radio New Zealand, who on Tuesday wrote, "The next edition of America’s Cup racing will switch from catamarans to high-performance monohull yachts, defending champions Team New Zealand have confirmed.  "And while the boats will be monohulls, they will also be foiling boats — lifting off the water like the catamarans did," RNZ reported.  These boats are sooooo 2017.
Here is your September Caption Contest(!). We’re excited to see what you all come up with for this quirky, head-scratching photo.
Ben, having climbed Mt. Coronado in the Sea of Cortez, checks out the beauty of nature.  Sonrisa
©Latitude 38 Media, LLC The obvious answer is that Benjamin Brettingham-Moore of the La Paz- and Tasmania-based Lagoon 440 Sonrisa, having climbed Mt.
Dorade is Down Under, adding to her collection of prizes in events like Audi Hamilton Island Race Week.
Hurricane Irma, which was described by some analyst as the ‘"size of France," has moved into Florida and the US.  © 2017 NASA After devastating the Caribbean, Hurricane Irma marched toward Florida, changing categories from 5, down to 3, and back up to a 4, according to ABC news.
As Hurricane Irma slowly churns her way out of the Caribbean, it’s difficult to assess the extent of the damage, and to say what’s next for the dozens of islands with economies reliant on tourism and the charter boat industry.
While natural disasters elsewhere have garnered the headlines, the western United States has not slid into September unscathed.
Did you wake up this morning, make coffee on your gimbal stove, and poke your head through the companionway, into your cockpit and onto Richardson Bay?
A satellite image of Hurricane Irma spinning violently in the Caribbean.  © 2017 NOAA Hurricane Irma gathered steam in the Atlantic before finally making landfall in the Eastern Caribbean early today, threatening thousands of lives and homes, as well as infrastructure, and one of the largest concentrations of sailboats in one of the premier cruising destinations in the world.
As flocks of cruisers prepare to head south this fall, their nav stations will be packed with more state-of-the-art electronics than ever before.