Archive for June 2012
With their pre-departure anxieties a distant memory, Puddle Jumpers were all smiles at the opening party of this year’s Tahiti-Moorea Sailing Rendezvous.
Paul and Rachel Chandler, who were kidnapped by Somali pirates near the Seychelles in October ’09 and were released a little over a year later, are ready to head out again on their repaired Rival 38 Lynn Rival.
Cabo Pulmo has been saved from a massive resort development…for now. © Webb Logg Cabo Cortes, a condo/hotel project in the East Cape area of Baja that was to rival Cancun in size, has been cancelled by outgoing Mexican President Felipe Calderón, reported Tim Johnson, Mexico City bureau chief for the McClatchy newspaper group.
"According to documents on the South Beach Harbor website, now hosted on SFPort.com, the new custodians of South Beach Harbor, the marina’s operating expenses increased 15% and their deficit spending increased 400% (from $205,000 to $809,000).
The fire that destroyed part of Pier 29 was not considered suspicious. No one was injured in the blaze.
There is a lot of confusion in the sailing industry about the status of Latitudes & Attitudes, the somewhat counterculture slick sailing magazine started 15 years ago in Redondo Beach by Bob Bitchin (birth name Robert Lipkin) and his wife Jody.
So how much did this delicious meal end up costing us? Read on to find out.
There’s a pretty cool story coming out of Bermuda at the end of this year’s just completed 635-mile Newport to Bermuda Race, the really big deal race on the East Coast.
Rescuers have been scouring the small Tongan island of Late, about 30 miles west of Vava’u, over the past few days in search of two Australian sailors whose Bavaria 50 Navillus broke up on a reef off the island last Thursday.
How did this happen? Simple. Some America’s Cup boats sailed by and literally scared the shit out of a flock of birds.
Enterprising sailors looking to make a quick buck off the America’s Cup hype might want to take note that the Coast Guard is issuing a public advisory about illegal passenger vessels that are plying Bay waters.
The stomachs of the crews on the ten 68-ft boats competing in Clipper Round the World ’11-’12 are just starting to settle after a brutal weekend in Race 13 from Nova Scotia to Derry-Londonderry in Northern Ireland.
With all the focus on the elections in Greece and the possibility that the country would elect a leader who wanted to default on their loans and destroy the European Union, not so much attention has been paid on what’s going on today in Cabo San Lucas.
We’re saddened to report that Max Young, who spent nine years circumnavigating aboard his Sacramento-based Perry 47 Reflections and who was on his way back to the Bay after spending the last couple years in the Caribbean, lost his boat Wednesday off the coast of Baja after a collision with a whale.
The crew of Groupama, skippered by Franck Cammas from France, celebrate taking first place in Leg 8, from Lisbon, Portugal, to Lorient, France, during the Volvo Ocean Race.
In an announcement that surprised few, US Sailing’s Independent Review Panel officially concluded that the Hunter 376 Aegean ran into North Coronado Island during the Newport to Ensenada Race in late April, killing everyone aboard as a result.
The 18th Singlehanded TransPac, a 2,120-mile romp from San Francisco Bay to Hanalei Bay on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, is slated to start on June 30, which means racers are undoubtedly working furiously to ready their boats, not to mention themselves.
As per our promise to keep Latitude readers informed when we learn that there have been violent narco incidents that might even tangentially have affected cruisers south of the border, we have two more reports from the last two weeks, both from the north shore of Banderas Bay.
One of the best things about owning a boat, especially on weekends like this past one, is taking the road less traveled and sailing to a favorite destination.
How Much and How Complicated [Editor’s Note: This is a long piece and only applicable to those who will be clearing out of Mexico for the States or some other foreign country.] Does it make a difference in terms of time and cost where you clear out of Mexico for another country?
The massive fishing dock drifted 5,000 miles across the Pacific. © Thomas Boyd / The Oregonian While we’re not inclined to buy into the mainstream media’s hysteria over the debris field set adrift after the Japanese tsunami in March 2011, the recent groundings of large — and very hard — objects can’t help but send a shiver down the spines of anyone who plans to sail home from Hawaii this summer.
A decade ago, June 8 was designated as World Oceans Day, "a chance to celebrate and honor the body of water that links everything on the planet," as Andrew Sharpless of the international environmental organization Oceana puts it.
We’re hungry for Mexico despite the fact that, thanks to mildly funky weather along the Baja Coast, we haven’t even done the Bash back to California with Profligate yet.
Due to the enormous size of the San Francisco Bay sailing community, the occasional arrival of a brand new boat is to be expected.
Beau Geste at the start of the Sail Noumea race. © Richard Gladwell / Sail Noumea The 18 crewmembers aboard the Hong Kong-based Farr 80 Beau Geste should be in the process of being rescued off their vessel as this is being posted.
If you don’t sign up soon, fleet members of the recently announced SoCal cruisers’ rally will be waving ‘ta-ta’ without you.
Fireworks go off as Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, skippered by Brit Ian Walker, finishes first on Leg 7 from Miami to Lisbon, Portugal, during the Volvo Ocean Race.
When Senator Christine Kehoe initially submitted SB 623 — legislation that would eventually ban copper-based bottom paint — last year, Latitude cautiously supported it, even though we’re not overly fond of government intrusion in people’s lives.
The June edition of Latitude 38 has just rolled off the presses and is now being distributed all along the West Coast — just in time for weekend reading.
Starting today at noon we’ll be taking sign-ups for the first ever SoCal Ta-Ta, a week-long Southern California version of the Baja Ha-Ha that will see a fleet of no more than 50 boats rally from Santa Barbara to Two Harbors, Catalina, with stops at Santa Cruz Island, Paradise Cove, King Harbor in Redondo Beach, and Two Harbors.