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Episode #77: Lin Pardey on Storytelling for Sailors

This week’s host, Nicki Bennett, is joined by Lin Pardey, who returns to Good Jibes for a second time. Lin has sailed over 200,000 nautical miles, 2 circumnavigations, and many more adventures of a lifetime with her late husband, Larry Pardey.

This time around, Lin is talking about her new course, Storytelling for Sailors. Hear how new storytellers can stand out, inserting content creation into your cruising life, how to build and keep an audience, updates from Lin’s life over the past year, and her recent induction into the National Sailing Hall of Fame.


 

This episode covers everything from storytelling to sailing awards. Here’s a small sample of what you will hear in this episode:

  • What has Lin been up to over the past year?
  • How did it feel to accept the award?
  • What is “Storytelling for Sailors?”
  • How do you go about storytelling as a sailor?
  • Why is storytelling important?
  • What has Lin learned about storytelling?
  • How do you make income in the sailing content space?
  • Does Lin have any events on the calendar over the next year?

Take Lin’s course here: https://www.thesailingchannel.tv/product/storytelling-for-sailors-usb/.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and your other favorite podcast spots – follow and leave a 5-star review if you’re feeling the Good Jibes!

Check out the episode and show notes below for much more detail.

Show Notes

Thanks for listening to Lin Pardey & Nicki Bennett on Good Jibes with Latitude 38. Subscribe here to receive Latitude 38 to your home each month. 

Check out the story we wrote on Lin and Larry Pardey in our April 1980 issue!

This episode is brought to you by Dream Yacht. Become a yacht owner and sail the world with Dream Yacht.

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