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If you watched the weekend’s America’s Cup action from the AC Park or from a boat on the water, you undoubtedly noticed a bevy of spectacular yachts that don’t normally grace the Bay.
Thanks to modern technology, we usually have good luck finding people and boats from the past.
The meaning is simple. The irreverent Andrew Vik of San Francisco did another summer cruise aboard his Islander 36 Geja in Croatia, and we’ll have a complete photo report in the October 1 Latitude.
Emirates Team New Zealand’s Dean Barker and Oracle Team USA’s Jimmy Spithill are ready to go head-to-head on Saturday.
So which team do you think will win the 34th America’s Cup? Write your prediction — including the final score — on a copy of today’s paper (yes, they still exist!)
As we look ahead to the start of America’s Cup 34 on Saturday, which will, of course, be raced in the most revolutionary multihulls ever seen on a Cup course, we pay tribute to one of the legendary innovators of the modern multihull movement: Dick Newick passed away on August 28.
Yesterday, as brilliant young sailors aboard AC45 catamarans were dazzling spectators during the Red Bull America’s Cup, an international sailing jury was concluding its investigation into cheating allegations within the same fleet during the 2012-2013 America’s Cup World Series events.
In the Wanderer’s story about Profligate‘s Baja Bash, he notes that he and Doña de Mallorca generally bring crew aboard for long passages.
A five-member international sailing jury is continuing to hear testimony today regarding allegations of cheating by Oracle Team USA staff during the America’s Cup World Series.
On the odd chance you don’t have much going on this weekend, here are a few events you might want to check out over the next few days: The artists have once again decended on Marin County for the 61st annual Sausalito Art Festival.
Cart load after cart load of stuff like this. It doesn’t mean that the stuff isn’t good or doesn’t have value, it just means you don’t have to carry it everywhere you go.
One would have assumed that the final race of the Louis Vuitton Cup on San Francisco Bay, between Luna Rossa and Emirates Team New Zealand, would have been the most popular high-speed catamaran racing show in the world during the last week.
Oracle Team USA’s were almost indomitable at last August’s AC World Series. © 2013 Oracle Team USA / Guilain Grenier "It is still possible that they (Oracle Team USA) will survive the jury hearings and the evidence gathered against them, but most observers are predicting that team members (will be) banned from the regatta and at least two points docked from Oracle’s defense of the Cup.”
We got a little grief from a few readers last week for suggesting even the remote possibility of the Italian-backed Luna Rossa Challenge staging a comeback in the just-completed Louis Vuitton Cup Finals.
"My daughter is getting married at Presidio YC on August 31," writes Lesley Madison, "and I’m looking for a small dinghy or El Toro-sized boat to hang from the club’s very strong and stable set of pulleys.
Ferrari thrills with Volkswagen pricing: F18s are fast, fun, and accessible. © 2013 Courtesy Cherie Sogsti This Sunday over a dozen Formula 18 catamarans will be racing a short course right in front on the Marina Green in San Francisco starting at 11:15 a.m.,
As predicted, imposing wind limits on America’s Cup racing has forced organizers to cancel several scheduled Louis Vuitton Cup Finals races.
While yesterday’s Louis Vuitton racing might not have been all that thrilling, there was some racing in front of the AC grandstands on Marina Green that was fast and furious when about 30 sailors aged 9-15 took to the water to race O’pen Bics on the ‘treacherous’ America’s Cup course.
After more than seven years of being a fabulous member of Latitude 38‘s editorial team, LaDonna Bubak — not to be confused with Doña de Mallorca — is leaving Latitude at the end of the year to do what you’d expect: go cruising with her husband Rob on their Wauquiez 47 Gazelle.
Some things start small and seemingly innocuous, but grow big and nasty. Just ask the ghost of Richard Nixon about his early denials of having anything to do with the little burglary at Watergate.
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