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Monohulls. Foiling monohulls. At least that’s the news we heard from Radio New Zealand, who on Tuesday wrote, "The next edition of America’s Cup racing will switch from catamarans to high-performance monohull yachts, defending champions Team New Zealand have confirmed. 
Here is your September Caption Contest(!). We’re excited to see what you all come up with for this quirky, head-scratching photo.
Dorade is Down Under, adding to her collection of prizes in events like Audi Hamilton Island Race Week.
Hurricane Irma, which was described by some analyst as the ‘"size of France," has moved into Florida and the US. 
As Hurricane Irma slowly churns her way out of the Caribbean, it’s difficult to assess the extent of the damage, and to say what’s next for the dozens of islands with economies reliant on tourism and the charter boat industry.
While natural disasters elsewhere have garnered the headlines, the western United States has not slid into September unscathed.
Did you wake up this morning, make coffee on your gimbal stove, and poke your head through the companionway, into your cockpit and onto Richardson Bay?
A satellite image of Hurricane Irma spinning violently in the Caribbean.  © 2017 NOAA Hurricane Irma gathered steam in the Atlantic before finally making landfall in the Eastern Caribbean early today, threatening thousands of lives and homes, as well as infrastructure, and one of the largest concentrations of sailboats in one of the premier cruising destinations in the world.
As flocks of cruisers prepare to head south this fall, their nav stations will be packed with more state-of-the-art electronics than ever before.
As Houston starts to slowly recover from the devastating floods of Hurricane Harvey, the Eastern Caribbean is hunkering down in preparation for Hurricane Irma, a Category 5 storm packing winds up to 185 mph.
We assume that sailors working in the industry have a passion for sailing, but there are details within that love that create rich stories, experiences and community.
During the month of August, we checked in with a couple of women skippers’ regattas that took place on San Francisco Bay.
Oddly, one of the biggest Bay Area headaches is trying to get away for a holiday weekend.
The moment you’ve all been waiting for has arrived! The September issue of Latitude 38 is hitting the newsstands as we speak.
Yesterday, the Santa Cruz 50 Bay Wolf — a charter boat operated by Captain Kirk San Francisco Sailing — was returning to Sausalito from San Francisco after dropping off their guests at Pier 40, when they heard a call on Channel 16.
As we look forward to Labor Day Weekend, we see that the Folkboat International Regatta continues at Corinthian YC through Friday; the 75th Windjammers Race from San Francisco to Santa Cruz will start on Friday.
Editor’s Note: A picture has been removed from this posting because it was brought to our attention that it was either a fake, or from a different storm entirely.
The start of a Friday night race in front of Encinal YC. In the background, the construction of Oakland’s new Brooklyn Basin development can be seen.
"I’m looking for a slip."  latitude/Richard
©Latitude 38 Media, LLC There are all kinds of harbormasters in the world, but not many of them are as accommodating as Dick Markie of Paradise Marina in Nuevo Vallarta.
These days, when it seems like the washing machine you bought last week is already broken, it’s a little mind blowing that a 131-year-old sailing ship looks like she was launched yesterday.
Even with dinghy wheels, it was a bit of a struggle for John and Gilly of Destiny to get their dinghy up the gravel beach at Punta Mita.
Usually when we talk about "protests" in the context of yacht racing, we’re talking about disagreements over rules and right of way between competitors, not the kind of protests with speeches, chanting, sign waving and yelling. But
In our occasional ode to the lone, brave soul who ventures to the pointy end of the boat to take care of business, we bring you a scene from spring time racing on the Bay.
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