There a certain white and red J/35 that you’ve probably seen at almost every Bay Area race. Jarlen has been a staple of YRA and coastal racing for almost 30 years.
Have you ever impressed yourself by installing, removing or repairing something on your boat that you thought was impossible to do on your own? Did you tackle a project that you really didn’t think you could manage — a project that you were going to pay a professional to do, before you asked for advice on the dock, watched a YouTube video, and decided to take a shot?
"The Panama Posse kicked off their rally to Panama last Wednesday, November 29, with a huge party hosted by Marina Puerto Isla de Navidad, Barra de Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico," writes Bay Area sailor Lucie Mewes of the Van de Stadt 41 Georgia, which has been cruising Mexico the last three years.
In November, the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) Enforcement Committee held a public hearing to review allegations of permit violations by Westpoint Harbor and Mark Sanders, the owner of the marina.
Six early members of Sausalito YC, left to right: Bill Whitaker, John Hooper (founder), Mark Mettier, Hank Easom, Robert Hobart and Jim Enzensperger (founder) in the late 1940s.
A boat that sailed in this year’s Baja Ha-Ha ran aground near Ensenada, about two weeks after the conclusion of the rally. Mr.
We’re calling it the Local’s Issue (hyperlocal, to be more accurate). The December Latitude 38 has stories concentrated in the Bay Area, including International 110s in Inverness, a young person putting some love into an old Albin Vega 27 in Sausalito, a profile on the J/35 Jarlen, an update on Cheyenne (formerly PlayStation), a short profile of Santa Cruz native Jim Holms plastic-to-diesel machine, and a musing on the joys of sailing small boats in San Francisco from one of our ‘new correspondents’, Mr.
We received a hot tip yesterday that designer Bill Lee of Santa Cruz had sold his 1977 sled Merlin, and that the legendary yacht would be trucked to Florida.
Within the pages of the aforementioned issue of Latitude 38, you’ll find the December Calendar, and within that you’ll find a long list of lighted boat parades and other festive waterfront holiday celebrations, ranging geographically from Portland, Oregon, to Southern California — starting as soon as tonight.
Three spots are open, wide open, for US Sailing Level 1 instructor training December 16-19 at Encinal Yacht Club in Alameda.
Back in the years BC — “before catamarans” — Latitude 38’s publisher owned a series of monohull sailboats.
It’s all pros aboard for the final act of the Extreme Sailing Series, but with many of our readers still in Baja California Sur after finishing the Baja Ha-Ha, some may wish to get into the act as spectators.
The second leg of the Volvo Ocean Race — a 7,000-mile marathon from Lisbon, Portugal, to Cape Town, South Africa — is now in the books, and it was pre-race favorite and ‘Leg 0’ winner MAPFRE who came out on top.
It’s been less than one month since the Clipper 70 Greenings ran aground on the opening day of the Clipper’s Race 3.
It may only be autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, but all along the West Coast of the Americas dozens of sailors are thinking ahead to early spring.
With credit to REI for creating  a ‘new Black Friday tradition’ by closing the doors on all their stores on Black Friday to encourage everyone to #optoutdoors, we are getting onboard with #optsailing for Black Friday.
What happens in Vegas might stay in Vegas. But not at Latitude. Longtime readers will know we’ve been pretty forthcoming about mistakes, screw-ups and bloopers (which can be one and the same, but not always).
Sailing is one of the great escapes, and it’s nice to have a boat that’s ready to go when the mood strikes and the weather is right.
Ramp launching a Catalina 22 in Santa Cruz’s East Harbor. © Vikas Kapur Seeking a change of pace from daysailing on San Francisco Bay, reader Vikas Kapur headed to Santa Cruz last weekend for a sail on Monterey Bay in a Catalina 22.
The Atlantic Rally for Cruisers, the granddaddy of all cruising rallies, got underway on Wednesday with the first of two fleets.
François Gabart’s team posted this graphic on social media. The team’s Twitter feed included a handful of congratulatory posts yesterday before the number finally settled out at an astounding 851 miles sailed in 24 hours.
We first started watching the Volvo Ocean Race in 1997/98. It was the last year it was called the Whitbread, and Bay Area sailor Paul Cayard — along with John Kostecki, Mark Rudiger and Kimo Worthington — would go on to win the ‘regatta’ on board the Swedish-flagged EF Language.  The last Whitbread was especially exciting because it was ‘online’, which was something of a revolutionary concept at the time.
Despite the fact that two out of three of the legs in the 750-mile Baja Ha-Ha cruisers rally from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas featured lighter wind than any of the 478 people on the 133 boats would have liked, the event was still a capital-B Blast (and the sailing in the 240-mile second leg was fabulous).
Seth Clark, owner of the Express 27 Current Affair, wrote the following on the Cal Sailing Club listserve: "There is a large deadhead (submerged log) just west X buoy.
Bay Area sailor and world-renowned navigator Stan Honey has been elected by the board of directors of the Sailing Yacht Research Foundation (SYRF) as their new chairman. The group was formed in 2006 with the goal "to develop and catalog the science underlying sailboat performance resulting in more accurate sailboat handicapping formulae for the benefit of all racing sailors." Stan Honey has a long list of sailing accomplishments.