The Ha-Ha text and photos are being sent over a Qualcomm satellite telephone using the Globalstar Satellite System. Qualcomm and Globalstar are the official communications solution of the Baja Ha-Ha.



Photo of the Day

Wish You Were Here

November 3 - Turtle Bay

As they say, there's always next year. Why not make it your New Year's resolution to be part of the Baja Ha-Ha VIII fleet?

In the meantime, check out the Baja Ha-Ha coverage below to see just some of what you have to look forward to.

Photo Latitude 38



Weather Updates

November 3 - Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

Tropical Weather

Are any hurricanes going to affect the Ha-Ha? You can check on the Mexico hurricane region at http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/e_pacific/2000/index.html.

It continues to be calm in the Atlantic/Caribbean.

San Francisco Bay Weather

To see what the winds are like on the Bay and just outside the Gate right now, check out http://sfports.wr.usgs.gov/wind/.

California Coast Weather

Looking for current as well as recent wind and sea readings from 17 buoys and stations between Pt. Arena and the Mexican border? Here's the place - which has further links to weather buoys and stations all over the U.S.: www.ndbc.noaa.gov/stuff/southwest/swstmap.shtml. Also check out http://facs.scripps.edu/surf/buoylist.html (but note that the Java Applet is still not working with some browsers on Macs - including your Webmistress's Netscape Communicator!)

Pacific Ocean Weather

You can view the University of Hawaii Department of Meteorology satellite picture by clicking here.

Pacific Sea State

Seas are normal in the Pacific, but you might check at: http://www.mpc.ncep.noaa.gov/RSSA/PacRegSSA.html.
For another view, see http://www.oceanweather.com/data/global.html.



Cruising

Keep 'em coming!

While the Baja Ha-Ha is underway, our cruising section will be on hiatus, but we'd still love to hear from you...so keep your pictures and stories coming!

Baja Ha-Ha Coverage

Qualcomm/Globalstar Satellite systems Baja Ha-Ha VII Update

November 3, 2000 - Turtle Bay, Baja California
360 miles south of San Diego.

About half of the 112 boat Baja Ha-Ha fleet has arrived in Turtle Bay by this morning, with another 40% expected before nightfall in time for the unofficial Ha-Ha party at Javier's Vera Cruz restaurant in beautiful downtown Turtle Bay. It's currently slow going on the course, however, as the winds for today and tomorrow are expected to be no more than 12 knots, and lighter in the morning and evenings. A few late starters aren't expected until tomorrow, the day of the Turtle Bay Beach Party.

In yesterday's report, we noted that the early arrivals in Turtle Bay were mostly big boats. After polling the group this morning, it turns out that all motored at least a little, which means that Tom Innerarity's J/44 'Wild Type' from Lafayette - which finished shortly after the big boats - was the first boat to have sailed all the way. Innerarity and crew benefited from being offshore, where after several predawn hours of 25 knots, they decided to drop their kite and proceed under white sails alone. Some smaller boats may have turned in even better sailing performances. Rick Gio and crew aboard the Freya 39 'Gypsy Warrior' arrived not too many hours later, having flown their shy kite in winds up to 30 knots well offshore. Sometimes there is more wind offshore and sometimes there's not; this year it paid to go offshore.

Crewman Alan Weaver reported a moment of levity aboard David Crowe's Choy-Morrelli 70-foot catamaran 'Humu-Humu'. Having flown one of Dennis Conner's ancient America's Cup kites during the night, when morning dawned they discovered the big 'U' from the 'U.S.' on the sail had fallen off and was lying on the deck.

The fleet found the fishing quite good down the coast, with lots of tuna and several dorado being reeled in. One seal was also hooked. He wasn't pleased, and it took nearly an hour to free him.

Turtle Bay is a small and remote fishing community of 4,000 - 2,000 of whom are children. The arrival of the Ha-Ha fleet has become a big event in their year, and many old friendships were renewed. Last year the steel ladder up the pier had fallen into such disrepair that cruisers had to land their dinghies on the beach. But as the early boats arrived this year, they found a welder working in the dark to complete brand new - and very snazzy - steps. In fact, one had to be careful when grabbing the handrail because it was often very hot.

Today's activities include catching up on sleep, fixing broken stuff, jogging on the beach, touring the bay, checking out Turtle Bay's many attractions and making friends. Air temperature here is 74 degrees and much warmer when the cloud cover moves on - as it often does. Water temperature is about 70 degrees. Wish you were here.

- The Grand Poobah reporting from aboard 'Profligate'.

Ha-Ha Note: We plan to bring you almost-daily coverage of the rally - time and technology permitting. Check our website for our progress in receiving the much anticipated (by us too!) pictures of the Ha-Ha as it's happening. (To get your fix on the days we are unable to update our site, peruse our archives.)

YOTREPS

November 3 - The Pacific Ocean and Cyberspace

Who is out making passages in the Pacific and what kind of weather are they having? Check out YOTREPS - 'yacht reports' - at http://www.bitwrangler.com/yotreps/



Racing

Still No Racing News

November 3 - New England

Yesterday's test still hasn't been answered by anyone correctly, so we offer it to you again today...

From Nov. 2 web posting -
Okay, we lied - there's nothing particularly interesting happening today in the world of yacht racing. Instead, we'll use this allotted space for a 'pop quiz' on cruising destinations.

Our racing editor went for a fall cruise - gasp! - in New England in early October, and claimed to actually enjoy it. (What's next - golf?) Showers, moorings and restaurants were found in every port, and the two cell phones aboard his friend's Baltic 39 were in constant use. "It wasn't exactly a hardship cruise," he admits. The weather was dicey, however, alternating between Indian Summer and the first cold, rainy days of the approaching winter.

We won't bore you with all the details. Rather, as a test to see if anyone out there is paying attention, we're offering a 'Latitude 38' t-shirt to the first reader who correctly identifies all three ports in the accompanying pictures. In the unlikely event of multiple correct responses, the tie will naturally be broken in favor of the most humorous email. Send your guesses to: rob@latitude38.com.

All photos Latitude/Rob

 



Top / Index of Stories / Subscriptions / Classifieds / Home

©2000 Latitude 38 Publishing Co., Inc.